Blog
February 12, 2019

Announcing WHAT WAY? DAT WAY!

Project WHAT! will host the first ever summit for Bay Area youth impacted by incarceration on March 30, 2019. Find out more, including how you can support this awesome event, here!

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January 22, 2019

Community Works in the News

For families with loved ones in prison, incarceration takes its toll

Click here to read the spotlight on some of our programs: https://oaklandnorth.net/2018/12/13/20181204_incarceration_williamsrodas/

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January 17, 2019

Community Works is HIRING

Are you interested in providing services to youth, families, and communities impacted by incarceration?

Community Works is now hiring in the following roles:

We strongly encourage formerly incarcerated individuals, children of incarcerated parents, and those intimately affected by the criminal justice system to apply.

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September 28, 2016

Project WHAT! 10 Year Anniversary!

Please join us for Project WHAT’s 10 year anniversary. A Decade of Dedication will celebrate 10 years of our youth advocacy work and service to families impacted by incarceration.

September 28, 2016

Being a Father, From Inside Prison

For prison inmates, being a parent is hard. You’re far away but you’re still here. And the visits and letters, those small points of contact, can become that much tougher for the distance.

TAGS: parenting
September 20, 2016

Captive Lives

Luna Garcia swipes through the photos on her phone until she finds it — the one of a young man with a slight mustache standing against a wall, his blue shirt neatly pressed, holding a chubby baby girl.

It’s the kind of picture someone might snap at a holiday dinner, a grainy image of a girl and her dad. But just out of the frame are armed guards and metal doors. It was visiting day at San Quentin State Prison.

September 19, 2016

Bonding Behind Bars

Sean Sanchez knows the routine.

Before anyone can ask, the 12-year-old pulls his pants pockets inside out and takes off his shoes, wiggling his toes to prove he’s not concealing drugs or weapons. Cleared by deputies, he’s allowed inside San Francisco County Jail No. 5 to see his father.